Narrow Results

Go
15 activities

The Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Communications portfolio includes products, events, and programs aligned with priority areas identified by the federal Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Education (CoSTEM). This portfolio of activities engages audiences in the story, the science, and the adventure of NASA's scientific explorations of our home planet, the solar system, and the universe beyond.

This Projects Tab contains links to individual project descriptions, including overviews, audiences served, reports, evaluation information, contact information, websites, and other features, organized by CoSTEM goals. The list of projects can be narrowed using the filters on the left sidebar. Click on a project’s name to view details. View activities that have been completed.

These projects are applicable to Undergraduate Student Experiences

CoSTEM 1:
STEM
Instruction
CoSTEM 2:
Youth and Public Engagement
CoSTEM 3:
Undergraduate Student Experiences
CoSTEM 4:
Working with Diverse Audiences
CoSTEM 5:
Graduate
Education
Astromaterials Education/Solar System Science For University Mentors and Facilitators/Pre-Service Educators

Astromaterials Education/Solar System Science For University Mentors and Facilitators/Pre-Service Educators
These are workshops and trainings for college students developed thematically around the topics of solar system science and astromaterials. The participants are prepared to share the science appropriately with K-12 audiences by extending their knowledge and giving them a hands-on experience with classroom activities. These are usually offered within a conference or larger professional development event. The standard content of solar system science and astromaterials is shared thematically to address the audiences’ needs or requests. The content is delivered through speakers, video, and hands-on activities. 

 

Discovery and New Frontiers: Mentor Training for NASA Space Science Days

Thematic training for college student-mentors preparing to lead a Discovery Program focused NASA Space Science Day event. The NSSD events are sponsored by an EPOESS grant to Charlie Galindo-ARES-JSC. The workshop offers mission content, hands-on experience with classroom activities, and strategies for implementing.

LADEE: Navajo Tech Model Building

The Navajo Tech Model Building activity is a collaboration between LADEE and the Computer Aided Design and Modeling Program at Navajo Technical College. Students in the program learn to produce solid 3-D models of the LADEE spacecraft for use by the LADEE mission and its EPO programs. The faculty of Navajo Tech provides students with instruction on equipment, materials, software, and techniques for model building while LADEE provides spacecraft CAD files, a lunar science overview, and mission briefing.

Mars Exploration Program: MRO/CRISM:  Student Data Team (High School)

The Mars Exploration Student Data Team (PI) program engages high school and undergraduate students with data from the CRISM instrument which is seeking traces of past and present water on the Martian surface. MESDT students have the opportunity to join the science team in the analysis of data from the CRISM instrument. The program provides students with authentic research experiences in the classroom, is conducted via distance learning technologies, and is designed to provide maximum flexibility for student teams.

NAI: Astrobiology REU at Penn State (Icy)

This project hosts summer undergraduate interns at the NAI's Penn State University team.  It's purpose is to provide an in-depth research experience for undergraduates with astrobiology researchers at PSU. The program occurs at Penn State University for 10 weeks during the summer session. The students participate in independent research under the guidance of one or more astrobiologists, a field trip to NASA and astrobiology-related sites around Washington, D.C., weekly seminars, laboratory tours, stargazing opportunities, discussion group, and a research symposium. Five interns were hosted by PSU faculty in the Summer of 2011.

NAI: Astrobiology REU at Penn State (Icy)

This project hosts summer undergraduate interns at the NAI's Penn State University team.  It's purpose is to provide an in-depth research experience for undergraduates with astrobiology researchers at PSU. The program occurs at Penn State University for 10 weeks during the summer session. The students participate in independent research under the guidance of one or more astrobiologists, a field trip to NASA and astrobiology-related sites around Washington, D.C., weekly seminars, laboratory tours, stargazing opportunities, discussion group, and a research symposium. Five interns were hosted by PSU faculty in the Summer of 2011.

NAI: Summer Interns at JPL (Icy)

This project hosts summer undergraduate interns at the NAI's Icy Worlds Team at JPL.  It's purpose is to provide an in-depth research experience for undergraduates with astrobiology researchers at JPL.  Ten interns were hosted by four faculty in the Summer of 2011.

NAI: Support to Undergraduate Conference at LPSC (Central)

This project supports undergrads from across the US to participate in the 2011 LPSC Undergraduate Conference.  Its purpose is to expose undergrads to the scientific conference environment and mentor them to pursue careers in science.  This NAI funding supports the larger project funded by EPOESS.

New Horizons: Student Dust Counter (SDC) Web Site - (2.3.22)

In addition to the students who created the instrument, the SDC’s own education and outreach team maintain a Web site that features the inside story of the instrument’s development and video interviews with team members. The SDC project is blazing a trail for future student-built instruments.  (http://lasp.colorado.edu/sdc/)

New Horizons: Student Dust Counter Instrument and Program (K-12 and Undergraduate)

The Student Dust Counter (SDC) is a 20-year homework assignment, but you won’t hear any complaints from the students handed the task. Designed by students at the University of Colorado at Boulder, SDC is detecting dust grains produced by collisions among asteroids, comets, and Kuiper Belt objects during New Horizons’ journey. It is the first science instrument on a NASA planetary mission to be designed, built, and “flown” by students.  With faculty supervision, the students also are distributing and archiving data from the instrument and lead a comprehensive education and outreach effort to bring their results and experiences to classrooms of all grades over the next decade. http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/ption

NLSI: NASA Academy NLSI Fellowship

NLSI supported the NASA Ames Academy through support of a student in addition to support of their summer project of lunar dust and biological systems interactions.  The undergraduate or graduate students spends 10 weeks at NASA Ames working alongside an ARC scientist. They are exposed to research at three other NASA centers (KSC, DFRC, JPL) and a wide variety of other research and commercial institutions (e.g. Desert Research Institute, Space Systems Loral, SpaceX).  The summer additionally included leadership training, team building exercises and approximately 20 seminars in order to expand their horizons and expose them to the whole space community. 

NLSI: Summer Student Internship Program

The NLSI Summer Student Intern is a grade 10-14 student support program. The program provides a 10 weeks summer research experience for grade 10-14 students. The purpose of the program is to increase the U.S. talent pool of lunar scientists by providing high school and two year college students an opportunity to spend a summer working on lunar science research with lunar scientist from the NLSI and attracting them to pursue graduate level studies in lunar science.

Solar System Treks

Solar System Treks Project (SSTP) provides: 1. planetary data products that are georeferenced, 2. data services (web APIs) for data access, 3. tools (a set of web-based portals, mobile applications, VR goggles and touch table implementations) that support measurement and study of planetary terrain and facilitate 3D printing of surface terrain, 4. infrastructure/platform that support visualization, exploration and research of landscapes for planetary bodies and Earth.

Student Planetary Investigators (PI)

The Student PI program provides high school and undergraduate students with authentic research experiences in the classroom using NASA data. The program is free, open to students and their teachers nationwide, is conducted via distance learning technologies and is designed to provide maximum flexibility for student teams. Live classroom sessions are mostly conducted during after school hours and sessions are archived for teams that wish to watch at alternate times. Students communicate directly with science team members and peers through an online bulletin board system. Currently students may choose to work with curriculum and data sets from Mercury, Mars, or the Moon as they work toward developing their own hypotheses and research projects. Student capstone projects include the presentation of original research projects to fellow student researchers and NASA scientists across the country.