Andy Shaner Andy Shaner

NASA Education Express Message -- Feb. 25, 2016

Posted on February 25, 2016 - 9:37 AM CST

Tags: Elementary | High School | Higher Education | Informal | Middle School | SMD E/PO Community | Educator | Underserved / Underrepresented | Scientists

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Feb. 25, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center -- STEM@NASA: Women's History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Throughout March 2016

Future Engineers 'Star Trek' Replicator Challenge
Audience: Students in the United States Ages 5-19
Entry Deadline: May 1, 2016

Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: May 15, 2016

STEM on Station -- Find Out What It's Like to Live Like an Astronaut!
Audience: Grades 6-12 Educators and Students

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest
Audience: 5-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

'Sky for All: Air Mobility for 2035 and Beyond' Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Submission Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

Call for Abstracts: 67th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time U.S. Graduate Students Attending U.S. Universities
Submission Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy's Summer 2016 Policy Internship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: Feb. 27, 2016, 10:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. EST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Next Optional Informational Session: Feb. 29, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: April 15, 2016

Library of Congress 2016 Summer Institutes -- Teaching With Primary Sources
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 29, 2016
Institute Dates: Multiple Dates in June and July 2016

NASA's Kennedy Space Center Celebrating Women's History Month With "Inspiring Girls Through STEM" Day
Audience: Underserved/Underrepresented Girls, Grades 4-12, From Collaborating Partners in Brevard County, Florida, and Surrounding Areas
Registration Deadline: Feb. 29, 2016

NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 1, 2016, 3-3:40 p.m. EST

2016 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Deadline: March 1, 2016

NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seek Students for Climate Research Initiative
Audience: 9-12 and Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

Now Accepting Applications for NASA Summer Internships
Audience: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students and Ph.D. Scientists
Next Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

"Museum Day Live!" Sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution
Audience: Informal Institutions
Registration Deadline: March 1, 2016
Event Date: March 12, 2016

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadlines: March 1 and April 1, 2016

NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: NASA Space Grant Student Presentations
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 3, 2016, 3:15-5 p.m. EST

2016 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 3-12
Entry Deadline: March 8, 2016

2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship
Audience: Freshman Students at Community Colleges in Virginia
Application Deadline: March 14, 2016

2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships
Audience: Minority Undergraduate Students (Underclassmen) at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: March 14, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in STEM-field Programs for a Master’s Degree at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Entry Deadline: May 16, 2016

Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium
Audience: Academics, Graduate Students and Independent Scholars
Abstract Submission Deadline: July 31, 2016
Symposium Dates: March 16-17, 2017

Help NASA Study Mars -- Planet Four: Terrains
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing Through Mid-2016

Call for Submissions -- NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

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Don't miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA's website:
-- Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
-- Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?

Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development


The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Solar System and Beyond: Extrasolar Planets
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Feb. 25, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will get an overview of the methods of identifying extrasolar planets and NASA resources for teaching about them. The activities presented in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards PS2, PS4 and ESS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/155799

Solar System and Beyond: Capturing Asteroids
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Feb. 29, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
Discover new history about our solar system as it unfolds through NASA’s OSIRIS-Rex Mission, the first U.S. mission to capture and sample an asteroid. This year, OSIRIS-REx will travel to a near-Earth asteroid and bring a small sample back to Earth for study. OSIRIS-Rex can be brought to the classroom through engineering design challenges and other resources that address the Next Generation Science Standards PS3 (energy), ESS1 (earth and space), and ETS1 (engineering design). Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/153884

Technology Drives Exploration: Robotics on a Budget
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: March 3, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST
Robots are part of our everyday lives. We use them in ways we don't always realize. What are robots? How are they used in our lives? How they are used at NASA? These are some of the questions explored in this webinar. Participants will learn how to use robotics inexpensively in the classroom to enhance students' STEM understanding by integrating NASA STEM robotics missions, curriculum, online resources and the NGSS Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science, or ETS. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161659

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center -- STEM@NASA: Women's History Month


Join NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM@NASA: Women’s History Month”! Throughout the month of March, the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM in this videoconferencing special event series. Women from across Goddard will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics -- through their research, missions, career, and the like -- with participating schools and other groups.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.

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Future Engineers 'Star Trek' Replicator Challenge


Calling all Starfleet cadets! "Star Trek," the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation and NASA want you to pioneer the future of food in space. Your challenge is to create a digital model of a food-related item for astronauts to 3-D print in the year 2050. We want designs that boldly go where no human has 3-D printed before and that help astronauts eat nutritious meals so they can live long and prosper.

You must specify one of the following locations for your 3-D print: our moon, another planet, another planet’s moon, or a spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit (explain where it is going and why). You also must specify the intended printing material (feedstock) for your 3-D print. This could be plastic, metal, recycled materials, locally sourced material, or any nonedible, 3-D printing feedstock you think would advance human space exploration.

Eating a meal in space goes beyond the actual food itself -- from growing food to devouring it. There are many things to consider, so check out our rules, design guidelines and education resources before to starting your design.

Student winners will receive a range of prizes, including a trip to New York for a tour of the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Museum with an astronaut, a 3-D printer for the winners’ schools or a "Star Trek" prize pack.

Entries are due May 1, 2016. For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/startrek.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.

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Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues


The Airport Cooperative Research Program is seeking applicants for its Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues. Through this program, the ACRP strives to encourage applied research on airport and related aviation system issues and to foster the next generation of aviation community leaders. The program is intended to stimulate thought, discussion and research by those who may become the future airport managers, operators, designers and policy makers in aviation. The focus of this research program is on applied research to help the public sector continue to improve the quality, reliability, safety and security of the U.S. civil aviation system well into the foreseeable future. 

The Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues will award up to 10 highly qualified applicants, selected by an ACRP panel of experts, a stipend of $10,000 each for successful completion of a research paper on a subject chosen by the candidate within the framework of the program’s purpose.

Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, or have a current student visa. Each applicant also must be officially enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited North American institution of higher learning for the academic year in a graduate course leading to a master’s or doctoral degree. Proof of both may be required.

Applications are due May 15, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPGraduateAwardProgram.aspx.

The ACRP Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration. Creating a selection panel, monitoring research progress, organizing a forum for presentation, and publishing the research papers are the responsibility of the ACRP of the Transportation Research Board. The Virginia Space Grant Consortium will manage the Graduate Research Award program under the ACRP’s direction.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to acrp@odu.edu.

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STEM on Station -- Find Out What It's Like to Live Like an Astronaut!


What is it like to live and work in space? How do astronauts brush their teeth, eat breakfast, and sleep aboard the International Space Station? Check out the “Day in the Life” series, which showcases astronauts answering these pressing questions!

Visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/dayinthelife/.

Learn more about this exciting opportunity and other ways you can bring the space station into your classroom by visiting NASA’s STEM on Station website. While you are there, stop by and learn more about the yearlong mission and how it is helping us on our #JourneytoMars. Opportunities, resources and more await at this station-focused site!

To check out the website, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education/STEMstation.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest

The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three possible targets for the Cassini spacecraft to observe and choose the one they think will yield the best scientific results. This year's targets are Saturn's rings and three of its moons; Jupiter as seen from approximately one billion miles away; and Saturn's moon Tethys passing behind Rhea, another of Saturn's moons. After researching the three options, students write an essay under 500 words explaining their choice.

The contest is open to all students in the United States in grades 5-12. The essays will be divided into three groups for scoring: grades 5-6, 7-8 and 9-12. All submissions must be students' original work. Participants may enter as individuals or as part of a team of up to four students.

The deadline for entries is Feb. 26, 2016.

For more information, visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/education/scientistforaday2015/.

If you have questions about this contest, please email scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov.

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'Sky for All: Air Mobility for 2035 and Beyond' Challenge

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is sponsoring the "Sky for All: Air Mobility for 2035 and Beyond" challenge. With a prize purse of $15,000, the challenge seeks innovative ideas for technologies that could be part of a clean-slate, revolutionary design and concept of operations for the airspace of the future.

Potential solvers are tasked with thinking outside the current air traffic management system box and with considering how to manage crowded skies, autonomous operations and cyber security of the system. The challenge is open to all individuals, age 18 or older, private teams, public teams and collegiate teams. Individual competitors and teams may originate from any country, as long as United States federal sanctions do not prohibit participation.

Registration is required and submissions are due Feb. 26, 2016.

For more information about this challenge, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/feature/challenge-is-on-to-design-sky-for-all.

Questions about this challenge can be submitted via the HeroX website at https://herox.com/SkyForAll/comments.

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Call for Abstracts: 67th International Astronautical Congress

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 67th International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time U.S. graduate students attending U.S. universities respond to this “Call for Abstracts.”

The IAC -- which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF; the International Academy of Astronautics, or IAA; and the International Institute of Space Law, or IISL -- is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1,000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Sept. 26-30, 2016, in Guadalajara, Mexico. NASA’s participation in this event is part of an ongoing effort to connect NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 67th IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel will select abstracts from those that have been accepted by the International Astronautical Federation. This opportunity is for graduate students majoring in fields related to the IAF research topics. Students may submit technical (oral) presentations and/or posters. Students may submit abstracts that are co-authored with their Principal Investigators. However, the student must be the “lead author,” and only the student will present at the IAC. Students must be available to travel to the conference to represent NASA and their universities. Students must be U.S. citizens, attending a U.S. university, who plan to enter a career in space science or aeronautics. Pending the availability of funding, graduate students selected by NASA to participate in the IAC will be considered for subsidy funding from NASA.

Many students and professors currently are involved in NASA-related research that could be considered for this submission. Students submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from professors who are conducting NASA research and/or from NASA scientists and engineers. Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following IAC categories:

-- Science and Exploration -- Systems sustaining missions, including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI
-- Applications and Operations -- Ongoing and future operational applications, including earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites
-- Technology -- Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion
-- Infrastructure -- Systems sustaining space missions including space system transportation, future systems and safety
-- Space and Society -- Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history, and law

The criteria for the selection will be defined according to the following specifications:
-- Abstracts should specify purpose, methodology, results, conclusions and areas for discussion.
-- Abstracts should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included.
-- Abstracts should clearly indicate that the material is new and original; they should explain why and how.
-- Prospective author(s) should certify that the paper was not presented at a previous meeting.

Abstracts must be written in English, and the length should not exceed 400 words. Tables or drawings are not allowed in the abstract.

NOTE: If you plan to seek assistance from NASA, you must submit to the International Astronautical Federation and to NASA.
-- Submit your abstract to the IAF at their website www.iafastro.org by Feb. 29, 2016 (14:00 CET).
-- Submit your abstract to NASA at https://iac.nasaprs.com no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on Friday, Feb. 26, 2016.

IAC Paper Selection
Submitted abstracts will be evaluated by the Session Chairs on the basis of technical quality and relevance to the session topics. Selected abstracts may be chosen for eventual oral or poster presentation. Any such choice is not an indication of quality of the submitted abstract. Their evaluation will be submitted to the Symposium Coordinators. They will make acceptance recommendations to the International Programme Committee, which will make the final decision. Please note that any relevance to the Congress main theme will be considered as an advantage.

The following information must be included in the submission: paper title, name of contact author, name of co-author(s), organization(s), full postal address, phone, email of the author and co-author(s). The abstract should specify purpose, methodology, results and conclusions. The abstract should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included, as well as clearly indicate that the material is new and original and explain why and how.

Please check the IAF website (www.iafastro.org) regularly to get the latest updates on the Technical Programme.

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White House Office of Science and Technology Policy's Summer 2016 Policy Internship Program


The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, or OSTP, is seeking students for summer 2016 internships. The OSTP advises the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The office serves as a source of scientific and technological analyses and judgment for the president with respect to major policies, plans and programs of the federal government.

Policy internships are open to interested students from all majors and programs, including law school programs. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who are enrolled, at least half-time, in an accredited college or university during the period of volunteer service. Students in undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in all fields are encouraged to apply.

While these positions are without compensation, the assignments provide educational enrichment, practical work experience and networking opportunities with other individuals in the science and technology policy arena.

Applications for summer 2016 internships are due Feb. 26, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about/student.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Rebecca Grimm at rgrimm@ostp.eop.gov.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy


Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you'll learn about some of the museum's fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on Feb. 27, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between Jan. 1 - June 30, 2017. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due April 15, 2016.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students.

Informational Sessions
To help organizations in preparing their proposals, the ARISS program coordinator will offer hourlong online information sessions. These are designed to provide more information regarding U.S. ARISS contacts and the proposal process, and offer an opportunity to ask questions. While attending an online information session is not required, it is strongly encouraged.

Informational sessions will be offered Feb. 29, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST and March 10, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST.

Advance registration is necessary. Email ARISS (ariss@arrl.org) to sign up for an information session.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group, including several countries in Europe as well as Japan, Russia, Canada, and the USA.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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Library of Congress 2016 Summer Institutes -- Teaching With Primary Sources


The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its weeklong summer programs for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in the District of Columbia, this professional development opportunity provides educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching, with an emphasis on student engagement, critical thinking and construction of knowledge.

The Library of Congress is offering five programs this summer: Four of the programs are open to teachers and librarians across all content areas and one focuses on primary sources in science, technology and engineering. During each five-day institute, participants work with Library of Congress education specialists and subject-matter experts to learn effective practices for using primary sources in the classroom, while exploring some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available on the library’s website.

General Institutes: Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians across the content areas.
-- June 27-July 1, 2016
-- July 11-15, 2016
-- July 18-22, 2016
-- July 25-29, 2016

Science, Technology and Engineering Institute: Recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology or engineering, or collaborate with those who do.
-- June 20-24, 2016

Tuition and materials are free. Participants will be responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.

Applications are due Feb. 29, 2016, and require a letter of recommendation.

For more information and to submit an application, visit http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to teachinglcsummer@loc.gov.

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NASA's Kennedy Space Center Celebrating Women's History Month With "Inspiring Girls Through STEM" Day

On March 5, 2016, the Education Projects and Youth Engagement Office at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is celebrating Women's History Month with an "Inspiring Girls through STEM" Day. The event will take place at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor's Complex and Public Engagement Center.

The daylong event's activities will include the following:

-- Panel discussions with five NASA Kennedy career women.
-- Lunch with an astronaut.
-- Educational workshops where students engage in STEM hands-on activities.

Event organizers are seeking 40 underserved/underrepresented girls in grades 4-12 from collaborating partners in Brevard County and surrounding areas to participate. The invitations to this event have been sent and are for the Kennedy Educate To Innovate, or KETI, Saturday Academy collaborating partners.

Registration for this event closes on Feb. 29, 2016. For more information about the event and to register to attend, contact Liz Wise at liz.wise-1@nasa.gov or 321-867-3307.

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NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission


NASA is developing a first-ever robotic mission to visit a large near-Earth asteroid, collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface, and redirect it into a stable orbit around the moon. Learn more about this mission during a special webcast event hosted by the Digital Learning Network at NASA’s Langley Research Center.

Education specialist Dr. Caryn Long will be interviewing Scott Belbin from the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission. In addition to sharing information and insight into the mission, the webcast also will feature a virtual tour of the ARRM facility.

The 40-minute event will take place on March 1, 2016, at 3 p.m. EST. To watch the event, visit https://plus.google.com/events/ckcu4hd35earjjr7667gntlqlcc.

To learn more about the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/asteroids/initiative/index.html.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

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2016 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest


Design a space settlement! Space settlements are permanent communities in orbit, as opposed to a place to work for a few months and go home. Designing a space settlement involves physics, mathematics, space science, environmental science and many other disciplines.

The NASA Space Settlement Design Contest is for K-12 students throughout in the world. Individuals or teams may enter. Grade levels are judged separately, except for the grand prize. A certificate will be sent to each participant.

Submissions must be received by March 1, 2016.

For more information about the NASA Space Settlement Design Contest, visit http://settlement.arc.nasa.gov/Contest/.

Please email questions about the contest to Al Globus at aglobus@mail.arc.nasa.gov.

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NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seek Students for Climate Research Initiative


The NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative is a summer internship opportunity for high school and undergraduate students to work directly with NASA scientists in a NASA research project associated with the science related to climate change.

During the summer session, high school interns will work for 40 hours per week for a six-week period and undergraduate students work full time for eight weeks to complete a research project. Interns will create a scientific research paper and presentation and present their scientific poster at a STEM symposium.

All applicants must be U.S. citizens who are at least 16 years old and reside within a 50-mile radius of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies located in New York City.

Applications are due March 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://smdepo.org/post/8474.

Please direct inquiries about the NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative to Matthew Pearce at matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov.

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Now Accepting Applications for NASA Summer Internships

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on summer internship opportunities available at all NASA centers. High school, undergraduate and graduate students are needed to help NASA scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering research, technology development and spaceflight operations activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students mentor-directed, degree-related, real-time tasks. If you think you have what it takes to be part of NASA’s Journey to Mars, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov today to apply or to learn more about the numerous opportunities available to you.

The deadline for summer applications is March 1, 2016!

Please submit inquiries about the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships One Stop Shopping Initiative, or NIFS OSSI, via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.

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NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program provides early-career and more senior scientists the opportunity to share in NASA's mission. NPP Fellows work on one- to three-year assignments with NASA scientists and engineers at NASA centers and institutes to advance NASA's missions in Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, space bioscience, aeronautics, engineering, human exploration and space operations, astrobiology, and science management.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but they may apply while completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go to https://npp.usra.edu/.

Please direct questions about this fellowship opportunity to npphelp@usra.edu.

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"Museum Day Live!" Sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution


On March 12, 2016, the Smithsonian Institution will sponsor a special edition of "Museum Day Live!" This annual nationwide event gets people into their local museums, science centers and other cultural institutions. Taking place during Women’s History Month, the March event welcomes all visitors but is specifically themed towards inspiring the nation’s girls.

NASA is very supportive of the project and through its Museum Alliance is working to have strong participation by STEM organizations. If your institution is interested in participating, visit http://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-live-march-2016/registration/. Registration closes on March 1, 2016.

To find participating venues in your area and to reserve tickets, visit http://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-live-march-2016/.

Please direct inquiries about NASA’s Museum Alliance to Amelia Chapman at Amelia.J.Chapman@jpl.nasa.gov.

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International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to participate in microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design with a provided template and submit short proposals presenting the experiments. Portland State University then manufactures test cells using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12. To facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, Scouts, etc., teams may include younger students as long as at least one team member is in grades 8-12. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the U.S., including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Students at Department of Defense Education Activity schools (www.dodea.edu), including those outside the U.S., are also eligible to participate.

The CELERE design challenge is a relatively new program and, as a result, the odds of selection are quite high. In 2014 and 2015, 100 percent of the entries were selected for full participation, where the student experiments were built and tested in microgravity. In 2016, selection of at least one qualifying entry is guaranteed from each state and listed territory, at least one DODEA school, and at least one Bureau of Indian Education school (http://bie.edu/). Students are strongly encouraged to apply!

Design proposals are now being accepted. Deadlines for submissions are March 1 and April 1, 2016.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.

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NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: NASA Space Grant Student Presentations

The National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program is a national network that includes over 850 affiliates from universities, colleges, industry, museums, science centers, and state and local agencies. Each year, Space Grant sponsors interns at NASA facilities. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network for presentations from three of these Space Grant interns.

On Thursday, March 3, 2016, at 3:15 p.m. EST, Eric Day will moderate the webcast event. Presentations will include the following:

-- David Hinckley, University of Vermont: “Interplanetary Spacecraft Trajectory Optimization”
-- Rachel Carmichael, University of Nevada, Reno: “Efficient Cyclization Methodology for Biologically Relevant Precursors”
-- Jeff Tessein, University of Delaware: “Effect of Coherent Structures on Energetic Particle Intensity in the Solar Wind”

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

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2016 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge


NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is rolling out a new look and format for this year's spinoff challenge. The OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge, or OPSPARC, challenges students to help raise awareness and understanding of NASA technologies and their many benefits to our everyday lives.

The newest incarnation of the challenge will provide contestants (students in grades 3 through 12) with a new tool, developed by Glogster, for creating and submitting their entries. Glogster is a cloud-based platform for presentation and interactive learning. The tool will allow contestants to combine different kinds of media on a virtual canvas to create multimedia posters and to access an existing library of educational content created by students and educators worldwide. Contestants will develop a Glog of their own as part of OPSPARC that will include information on spinoffs and NASA missions. The students also will create video describing their own ideas for a new NASA spinoff technology.

After completing their Glogs, 20 teams of students in grades 9 through 12 will be invited to work with college student mentors to further develop their spinoff concept within a 3-D, multi-user, virtual-world setting through creation of computer-aided design, or CAD, models and application of engineering and business analyses on their spinoff concepts. This year’s InWorld portion of the contest is being sponsored by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope project.

Students who submit the winning entries in each age category will have the opportunity to visit NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for an awards ceremony and workshop to be held in their honor. The workshop will include a behind-the-scenes look at Goddard, the chance to meet some of the top minds at NASA, and the opportunity for the students to design and create their own public service announcement video with guidance from NASA video producers and actor Peter Cullen, the voice of the TRANSFORMERS character OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and submit Glogs is 11:59 PM EST on March 8, 2016.

To learn more about the challenge and to register to participate, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/opsparc/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2015 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship


The Virginia Space Grant Consortium encourages academically talented individuals to pursue studies and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. The VSGC is offering a limited number of scholarships to students majoring in STEM fields at any campus in the Virginia Community College System.

These $2,000 scholarships are competitive awards based on academic merit for students demonstrating an interest in NASA's missions and STEM-related careers. The VSGC strongly supports students in technical career pathways who are preparing to transfer to institutions of higher learning while developing the essential skills for a competitive global workforce.

Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled in the Virginia Community College System.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 14, 2016.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/ccstem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Anne Weiss at aweiss@odu.edu.

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2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering renewable scholarships to undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000.

The scholarships are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group and are enrolled fulltime at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least one year of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a sophomore during the 2016-2017 academic year.

The STEM Bridge Program connects students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s mission.

This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit and the quality of interest essay, as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to the student’s interest in STEM areas.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 14, 2016.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Anne Weiss at aweiss@odu.edu.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women paid the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, ultimately leading to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/scholars_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships


The Texas Space Grant Consortium has established a new Educator STEM Scholarship Program. These $1,500 scholarships are intended to recognize teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at a TSGC member institution.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor's degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a Consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, providing the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master's candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/fellows_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion


Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year's NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology. The main source of thrust for the students’ concept may come from DEP or a combination of DEP and conventional propulsion devices (turboprops, turbofans, etc.). The challenge for the design team is to determine the most advantageous application of DEP for their aircraft and to justify their selection.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 16, 2016.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium

The History Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the Department of History at the University of Alabama Huntsville invite academics, graduate students and independent scholars to submit proposals for papers to be presented at a two-day symposium, March 16-17, 2017. The symposium will take place at the University of Alabama Huntsville and will address the role/relationship of NASA to the “Long” Civil Rights Movement, particularly in, but not limited to, the Deep South (Huntsville, Florida, Houston, Mississippi and New Orleans).

The conceptual framework for the symposium is provided by Jacquelyn Dowd Hall’s 2005 essay in the Journal of American History, "The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past," which called upon historians to produce new "modes of writing and speaking that emphasize individual agency … while also dramatizing the hidden history of politics and institutions." Along these lines, the conference welcomes papers addressing the Civil Rights experience across NASA that not only explore the experience of African Americans, but also of women, immigrants and other politically/legally marginalized groups. The intention is to publish a subset of the papers as an anthology.

Those interested in presenting a paper at the symposium should send an abstract of no more than 400 words and a short biography or curriculum vita, including affiliation, to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov or Dr. Stephen Waring at warings@uah.edu by July 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/call-for-papers-nasa-in-the-long-civil-rights-movement-symposium-university-of-alabama.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov.

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Help NASA Study Mars -- Planet Four: Terrains

Help NASA study exotic landscape features near the south pole of Mars! In this citizen science project, you'll view images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Context Camera. Your input will help scientists identify possible areas for even more detailed examination with the orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. HiRISE can reveal more detail than any other camera ever put into orbit around Mars.

Some of Mars resembles deserts on Earth, but seasonal freezing and thawing of carbon-dioxide ice (known on Earth as "dry ice") at the Martian poles creates some unusual landscape features. There’s a lot of territory to cover, so scientists need your help identifying what and where these features are.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the "Planet Four: Terrains" website at https://www.zooniverse.org/#/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains.

To learn more about NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its mission at the Red Planet, visit http://mars.nasa.gov/mro/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Whitney Clavin at whitney.clavin@jpl.nasa.gov.

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Call for Submissions -- NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)


The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.