S'COOL - Student Cloud Observations OnLine: Terra, Aqua and NPP

Mission Name:
S'COOL - Student Cloud Observations OnLine: Terra, Aqua and NPP


Project Description:
The S'COOL Project involves students (ages 5-20+) in real science, making and reporting ground truth observations of clouds to assist in the validation of NASA's CERES satellite instruments. S'COOL observations provide one more piece of the puzzle. Participants

  1. obtain satellite overpass schedules,
  2. observe and report clouds within +/-15 minutes of the satellite's passage,
  3. compare and classify the agreement between the ground and satellite views."


Lead Institution:
Langley Research Center (LaRC)


Partnerships:
S'COOL is implemented through the Terra, Aqua, and NPP missions. We are developing a new partnership with the Cloud Appreciation Society to facilitate submittal of cloud pictures and to broaden the impact of S'COOL.


Metrics:

Number of K-12 Students, Direct Interactions, FY12 (From OEPM): 1,215

Number of K-12 Teachers, Direct Interactions, FY12 (From OEPM): 299

Number of Informal Educators, Direct Interactions, FY12 (From OEPM): 10

Number of Faculty, Indirect Interactions, FY12 (From OEPM): 3,500
Number of Faculty, Direct Interactions, FY12 (From OEPM): 458

Other Metrics
Teachers from 83 countries have registered with the project. Students from all 50 states, most US Territories, and 63 countries have reported more than 100,000 cloud observation reports to S'COOL.


Effectiveness and Impact:
Evaluation findings and impact statements:
A rigorous outside evaluation was conducted in 2006. The team maintains a variety of metrics, and continually looks for better ways to assess the project within the constraints of the Paperwork Reduction Act and various Privacy regulations.

"Teachers felt strongly that the project was useful, and that it kept students engaged. Several teachers commented that the project often brought out leadership qualities and sparked interest in students who were reluctant to participate in regular classroom activities. Students loved the idea that they were helping NASA conduct real research. 100% of non-active teachers indicated that they would have participated if they had known the state standards that were addressed. Even teachers who did not use the program spoke highly of it, and hoped to someday have the time to fully engage. Several teachers expressed concerns that the materials were not available in Spanish (this has been addressed)".

Audience quotes:
Several teachers commented that the project often brought out leadership qualities and sparked interest in students who were reluctant to participate in regular classroom activities.

Attachments: